Entries to the Horse World Remembers Book of Condolence will be on display at the Royal Windsor Horse Show 2021, as a gesture of appreciation for the Duke’s incredible life and achievements.

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My wife and I both compete in horse driving trials in the US. We are forever grateful for Prince Philip's efforts to create this wonderful sport. Driving has changed and enriched our lives and we find great enjoyment in competing with our friends. As it turns out, the small town we live in is named "Windsor" and it boasts the highest concentration of carriage drivers in the US.

The photo I submitted shows HRH watching the driving competition at the 2017 Royal Windsor Horse Show. We were privileged to attend that show and even more so to receive a special tour of the Windsor Castle Royal Mews.

William Allen
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I’ve been “dining out on this story” for years…
In 1997 the Carriage Association of America board meeting was scheduled to be part of the annual CAA trip to Windsor. As a courtesy, Jill Ryder invited HRH Prince Philip Duke of Edinburgh to attend our board meeting knowing that because it was the opening of parliament and the Windsor show he would probably be too busy to attend. Jill received a note saying that though Prince Philip would not be able to attend the board meeting, he would be glad to attend our luncheon. She promptly acknowledged his acceptance of our luncheon invitation. (A luncheon had not been on the agenda but now it was!) At the time, Stewart Morris, Jr., was President and I was one of the V. P.’s. Stewart informed the board members that we would be asked to introduce ourselves, our spouses and, in a few words, tell Prince Philip why we had joined the CAA.

How many different ways can you say “I like collecting and driving carriages?” If I could speak first, maybe what I said wouldn’t sound trite. I asked Stewart if I could be the first speaker, but I didn’t receive an answer. I had something “up my sleeve” but I didn’t know if I had the courage to pull it out.

Jim and I arrived in Windsor the morning of the luncheon; thoroughly jet lagged. We went to our B & B and showered, my hair dryer blew up as it didn’t like the electric converter and we rushed to the Harte and Garter for the luncheon. Steve and Lynn Olsen brought a case of California wine to be served before lunch but the board members were all too concerned about perfect behavior to take a glass. We had a crash course in how to behave with royalty—don’t speak until you are spoken to and don’t touch or shake hands unless HRH takes your hand—fat chance. There we stood like a bunch of wooden cigar store Indians afraid to say a word as it might be the wrong word. The Prince arrived and we all went in to find our place cards in the dining room. Low and behold my assigned seat was right next to Him! The Prince was sandwiched between Jack Pemberton and me.

Part way through the luncheon, Stewart stood up and introduced himself and thanked Prince Phillip for attending our luncheon. I think every board member was holding his breath. Stewart called on me. I stood up but I didn’t introduce myself or Jim. I had decided to liven up our little group. If I said something a little outrageous and got a laugh, maybe everyone would relax. I said, “When I was a little girl, my mother told me that if I was good, someday I would meet a prince.” Prince Phillip laughed, in fact he guffawed. The ice was broken and everybody laughed. Prince Phillip leaned over and asked me if I was good and I told him that I was very good.

I introduced myself and Jim and said that I began driving because of a love for horses and then became interested in carriages. I finished by saying that I had only been in England a few hours but I thought I knew the difference between an American and an Englishman. An American thinks that 100 years is a long time and an Englishman thinks that 100 miles is a long distance. Prince Phillip laughed and pounded the table, too. It’s not that funny so he must have been obliged to sit through a lot of boring speeches. The board members seemed to relax. No one was planning to say anything as outrageous as what I had already said. They were home free.

Prince Phillip was a stimulating luncheon conversationalist. He had firm ideas and those who know me feel I do as well. He asked, “What kind of horses do you drive?” “I drive crossbred ponies,” I answered. He said, “You mean mongrels.” I said, “No, I mean ponies with hybrid vigor.” He asked, “What kind of carriages do you drive?” I said, “I prefer to drive antique carriages as I think the ride is superior.” He replied, “I will only drive modern vehicles as antiques are dangerous.” I replied, “I think it depends on the kind of driving you do.”

When the luncheon was almost complete, I asked the Prince about the Fell ponies he drove. I told him that I had only seen one Fell pony. He asked if I would like to see his ponies and before I could answer, Jack Pemberton leaned over and said, “If Vicki is going to see the ponies, we are all going to see the ponies.” I’ve always been a little in awe of Mr. P. and maybe the Prince felt the same way because the next morning, 125 CAA members trooped into the Royal Mews to see the ponies and the carriages. As this tour was definitely not on the schedule, the staff had been up all night polishing the carriages.

The CAA trip provided a “once in a lifetime” opportunity for a woman who grew up on a farm in Wisconsin. Is it any wonder I “dine out on this story?”
__Vicki Nelson Bodoh, a Past-President of CAA

Vicki Nelson Bodoh

The Fell Pony world thanks you for your support and love. Drive on!

Liz Skelton

Thank you for all that you did for the equestrian world in your amazing lifetime.

Nancy Myers

You have given so much to the sport of Combined Driving not to mention beginning FEI competition with the first writing of international rules. Leadership, sportsmanship, support and an exemplar in life. Many, many fond memories of earlier days at Catton, Sandringham and Windsor. Your presence will be so missed.

Martha and Richard Nicoll

Truly inspirational to reflect on the wonderful and richly deserved tributes to His Royal Highness Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. We have such cherished thoughts of Prince Philip’s impressive carriage driving displays at our beloved Royal Windsor Horse Show. As well as often seeing His Royal Highness driving his team of horses brilliantly and skilfully through the Cambridge Gate at the Long Walk.
HRH Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh’s contribution to Equestrian Sports, Windsor Great Park, and, of course, so many leading Conservation Projects, as well as, establishing The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award, remain his enduring and inspirational legacy to us all. My heartfelt thoughts are very much with Her Majesty The Queen, and the entire Royal Family, at this time and always.
Vivien Mackintosh

Vivien Mackintosh
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During my employment at The H Power Group in 2016, I sat in the lower floor office which overlooked the back of the stables. I use to love watching you and your ponies set off on your carriage drives around the private grounds of Windsor Castle. On the couple of occasions I bumped into you in the office corridor, I was always in a fluster of what to do; curtsey, salute, bow, run!!! You always put me at ease with "Stand up girl no need for that"

Louise Kaiser

Sincere condolences to Her Majesty and all Members of the Royal Family.
HRH The Duke of Edinburgh was a truly remarkable man who touched so many lives over his own long life. He will will be greatly missed.
Peter Quantrill

Peter Quantrill

I had the pleasure of meeting some family members of the Duke of Edinburgh a few times,my prayers are with the Royal family... Although I never had the honor to meet him, but from the bottom of my heart, he was always being a man of great courage, a loyal husband and a role model among the Royalties. His noble deeds will be forever remembered by the people around world. Rest in Peace.

Haofeng “Edward” Tang

I have known you all my life. I have followed your journeys across the world. I have watched as you supported and loved Her Majesty our Queen.

You were there always in the background but you were there. You will be missed immensely by your wife, family, the nation and the commonwealth.

Your funeral was extremely emotional but also so dignified. I will miss you.

Carol Twist

To HRH Duke of Edinburgh
You were a significant influence in all equestrian sports especially Mounted Games and all Pony club riders owe you a great deal. Your contribution to the defence forces, various charities and other organistaions you supported are eternally grateful. Thank you for everything you have done for your country, the Queen and the Commonwealth. RIP

Shane Voigt

Thank you Sir
So much I would like to say, but where to start and where to end ?
As a child I loved being part of the Prince Phillip Games, riding for the Enfield Chace Pony Club in Miss Midds team in the 1970s
My love and admiration of the Cleveland Bay Horse, I have had the honour of owning four CB xTB horses ( 3 I have bred ) they have been lifelong and amazing friends ( never sold on)
My huge respect and admiration of you, your war service and her Majesty’s “strength and stay” for all those decades. We will never know all that you have done and been in those years. So I will just finish by saying , thank you for being you .

Gill Greenwood
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The Duke at 85 “just getting on with it” in his last competition at Alnwick, August 2006.
His spirit, sense of humour and presence was an inspiration to so many, his achievements and support to Queen and country will never be forgotten.
HRH, Thank you for the memories.
Our thoughts are with the Queen and the Royal Family at this difficult time.
John & Sandy Punyer

John & Sandy Punyer

My love affair with horses started nearly 60 years ago and continues to this day. I can remember the thrill of competing as a teenager for the Prince Philip Cup in the crazy sport of Pony Club Mounted Games. My family could not afford an expensive pony, I was on a loaned riding school pony but the experience of taking part has stayed with me to this day.
Sixty years on and I now volunteer at Riding for Disabled where I help with carriage driving and for 5 years I have been part of the fantastic team of volunteers at Royal Windsor Horse Show.
I have had the honour of watching HRH Price Philip driving his carriage at Windsor and to witness the sheer thrill of the PC Mounted Games in the Castle Areana.
Such an amazing legacy and an inspiration to many generations of horse lovers worldwide. Your knowledge and horsemanship will be sorely missed.

Julie Nisbett

Thank you.
I only know realise the importance of your work across the world.
I wish I had come to know you.
R.I.P Your Highness. Job well done!

Jackie Hurst-Brown

Such a pioneering individual who made me hold my breath in anticipation to what his comments would be. Always said what was on his mind, politically correct or not. I appreciated his honesty and tact.

Shirley Cunningham

With grateful thanks for all your many years of dedication to Her Majesty the Queen and Country. We salute you.

Kate & Peter Dodman

It was a day of great sadness when we learned of the passing of HRH Prince Philip. I have never known a time without you standing by the side of our Queen as her Consort.

Such a wonderful man and horseman! We loved the Prince Philip PC games which my son enjoyed on his pony, huge fun. You inspired so many with your energy and lust for life, knowledge and evolving times, and the honourable way in which you were devoted to our beautiful Queen and your family, and country.

Total respect and admiration for you dear sir, our Duke of Edinburgh, you have become a glorious legend for our country to be very proud of. RIP

Amanda Towle

"Here comes the Duke" Heard so often at the water hazard at RWHS. His unmistakable figure presenting the trophy for the wonderful Prince Philip Mounted Games, these so typical of his inspiration and legacy and many, more memories for which we say thank you. Royal Windsor Horse Show will not be the same without him.
"There goes the Duke" driving his team to heaven. Rest in peace Sir, and God Bless Her majesty the Queen

Victoria jacobsen

Many years ago we heard that the Queen was coming to open a leisure entre in the nearby town and that her route was along our country lane.
I rode down to a little roundabout hoping to see her and her car approached slowly, with Prince Philip on my side. He saw me on the horse, smiled and then gave the Queen three enormous digs in the ribs with his elbow to get her attention. She turned, saw the horse, smiled very happily and waved.
What a great team they were.

Adrianne Smyth

We are deeply sorry about the loss of The Duke of Edinburgh and sending our warmest condolences.

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Thank you for all your contribution & support to the horse world. We will miss you lots, but know that you will be watching over us, especially when we visit Windsor park. Rest in peace our friend x

Keren Caird

What great tributes are being left for our wonderful Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. A real gentleman in all sense of the word. He is a credit to our Royal Family and our country His Duke of Edinburgh Award Scheme has encouraged so many young people to reach their potential. He had a brilliant sense of humour, very British and did not like fools. He undertook a life of genuine service to our country and I am so grateful for all he has done for us and proud to be part of a superb culture. Thank you Prince Philip for your loyalty and all you have done for us.

CAROLINE SOPER

I have been very fortunate and honoured to meet HRH Prince Philip on many occasions. May I offer my condolences to the Queen and the Royal Family at the loss of such a great man. HRH Prince Philip, The Duke of Edinburgh enjoyed the company of carriage driving folk around the world, who were privileged to be involved. His contribution to our sport as an administrator with the rules, carriage designer, innovator, author, competitor, coachman, judge, is so immense it is unmeasurable. Thank you Sir.

Jeannie Lane

A loving husband, father, grandfather and great grandfather. A remarkable equestrian. An example for us all. RIP.

Marian Thomas